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Law Schools in USA

Thank you for visiting our site. Here, you will find best law schools in each state of the country. Please click on the link below to find top law schools in your area. For each school, you will get information about admissions, tuition, scholarship, career, etc.

Law Schools in USA

If you need information about best law programs only, you can visit AbbreviationFinder.org to find the list of top-ranked law schools and their acronyms. Otherwise, you can click on the following link to find specific information about each law school in the United States of America in alphabetical order. Again, based on AbbreviationFinder.org, USA is used to stand for the country of United States.

Education in the United States is largely decentralized and developed on the basis of local initiatives. The cultural and linguistic diversity of the great nation has therefore become an increasingly central theme of education in relation to national unity.

In particular, the idea of ​​equality has played an important role. Although most European countries in the 1800s. had highly selective school systems, especially at the secondary level, and although many of the American schoolchildren of the century were inspired by this, it has never been so in the United States.

In the 1900s, on the other hand, educational thinking in the US has greatly influenced educational development in the rest of the world. Examples include: mention is the reaction in the 1960s to the sputnik shock: the science-centered curriculum thinking that would reduce the distance between science and school subjects, as well as the special preschool programs, Head Start, which included educational support for preschool children.

The 1983 A Nation at Risk report , which contained disparaging criticisms of education in the United States, was followed by a quality debate that still characterizes educational thinking throughout the world, including in Denmark.

The federal Department of Education has no direct powers in the field of education. However, it indirectly affects the development, i.e. by supporting educational research through the establishment of specific areas of focus, such as access to education for ethnic minorities.

Each state has the primary responsibility for education in its own territory. However, most of this responsibility is most often delegated to the more than 15,000 local school districts (1999), which therefore exhibit wide differences. Ca. 2/3 of the cost of public schools covered by local taxes, while the states pay 20 to 30%, and the federal government under 10%.

The courts also play an important role in the field of education, as several fundamental judgments on, for example, blacks' access to education have triggered general reforms in the field of education.

Schooling is public and free in all states with 9-12 years of education, in most states from the age of six. The preschool, which in its last year is followed by ca. 92%, is organized as nursery school, prekindergarten or kindergarten (1996). Then follows elementary school for 6-11 year olds. However, an increasing number of schools also have a middle school for 10-13 year olds. After elementary school follows the six-year high school, which can be divided into a three-year junior high school and a similarly three-year senior high school, which is completed by approx. 85%. Ca. 11% of all high school students attend private institutions.

Almost half of the students who complete high school continue on to higher education, most often college. The more than 3000 (1999) higher education institutions in the United States constitute a diverse crowd, from small local institutions to internationally highly esteemed private universities such as Harvard, Stanford and MIT. At this level, approx. 22% of all students at private institutions (1998).

 

U.S. Law Schools

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