Hawaii State Travel Guide

North America

Lanai, Hawaii

Lanai
United States Island
Location
Country United States
archipelago Hawaiian Islands
Province Hawaii
Location Pacific
Coordinates 20°49’30″N, 156°55’12″WL
General
Surface 364 km²
Inhabitants
(2010)
3102
County Seat Lanai City
Length 29 km
Width 21 km
Highest point Lānaʻihale (1026 m)
Lanai from space (Landsat).

Lanai is one of the Hawaiian Islands that are part of the US state of Hawaii. The island has about 3200 inhabitants and has an area of ​​364 km². Lanai is approximately 29 km long and 21 km wide. The highest point is Lānaʻihale, 1026 m above sea level.

The main place on Lanai is Lanai City.

In 1922, James Dole, the president of the Hawaiian Pineapple Company (later Dole Food Company), purchased the entire island and developed much of the island into the world’s largest pineapple plantation. In 1992 the last pineapple plantation closed, after which the economy of the island mainly depends on tourism. The island was then owned by James H. Murdock, who, among other things, made plans for a large wind farm on the island. In 2012, 98% of the island was purchased by Oracle CEO Larry Ellison.

Kahoolawe, Hawaii

Kahoolawe
United States Island
Location
Country United States
archipelago Hawaiian Islands
Province Hawaii
Location Pacific
Coordinates 20° 33′ N, 156° 36′ W
General
Surface 115.6 km²
Inhabitants no
County Seat Hakioawa (formerly)
Length 18 km
Width 9.7 km
Highest point Lua Makika (452 ​​m)
Kahoolawe from space (Landsat)

Kahoolawe is an island that is part of the US state of Hawaii. The island is uninhabited and has an area of ​​115.6 km², making it the smallest island of the archipelago. Kahoolawe is approximately 18 km long and 10 km wide and is located 11 km southwest of Maui. The highest point of the island (452 ​​m) is the rim of the crater Lua Makika on the top of Puʻu Moaulanui. There is little fresh water on Kahoolawe because the island lies in the rain shadow of the volcano Haleakala on Maui.

From 1941 to 1990, the island was used as a training ground for the United States Army and Navy. Since 1993 it has been a protected area, the Kaho’olawe Island Reserve. Today, the island may only be used by Native Hawaiians for cultural, spiritual, and other purposes.

Maui, Hawaii

Maui
United States Island
Location
Country United States
archipelago Hawaiian Islands
Province Hawaii
Location Pacific
Coordinates 20°48’0″N, 156°18’0″WL
General
Surface 1883 km²
Inhabitants
(2010)
144.444
County Seat Wailuku
Length 64 km
Width 42 km
Highest point Haleakala (3055 m)
Maui from space (Landsat); the small island is Kahoolawe.

Maui is an island in the US state of Hawaii. With 1,883 km² it is the second largest island in the archipelago. The island consists of two volcanoes, Haleakala (3,055 m) and the remnants of the older West Maui Volcano, which are connected by an isthmus. Because this isthmus lies like a valley between the volcanic mountains, Maui is also known as “The Valley Isle”.

There are 144,444 inhabitants, making the population density 62 inhabitants per square kilometer. The largest places on the island are Kahului, Wailuku, Lahaina and Kīhei.

Climate

At sea level, Maui has a tropical climate year round. Average temperatures are between 24 and 27 °C in summer and about 2–4 °C lower in winter. Water temperatures in the Pacific are 24–27°C. The rainy season is from November to April. The amount of precipitation varies depending on the location on the island. The northeastern windward side of the island along the coast near Hana receives nearly 10 m of precipitation per year, making it one of the wettest places on Earth, while Kihei, which is on the leeward sideof the volcano Haleakala, gets only 250 mm per year.

Economy

The main sectors of the island ‘s economy are agriculture and tourism. Most of the fertile isthmus is used for growing sugar cane and pineapple.

The island’s largest airport is Kahului Airport (IATA code: OGG; ICAO code: PHOG ). From here there are connections to the other islands of Hawaii, as well as direct flights to the North American mainland, for example to Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Atlanta and Vancouver.

Tourism

In 2002, a total of more than 2 million tourists visited Maui. The main tourist areas are on the coast between Lahaina and Kapalua, and between Kihei and Wailea. While Oahu is frequented by tourists from Japan, Maui is most popular with tourists from the United States and Canada.

The island’s many attractions include the rainforest – lined narrow coastal road to Hana, the Kahekili Highway, the 118 km² Haleakala National Park, the Iao Valley, and the surf -famous beaches on Maui’s north coast (Ho’okipa, Jaws, Lanes, Spreckelsville, Kanaha).

On Maui is the Kahanu Garden, a botanical garden managed by the National Tropical Botanical Garden.

Nakalele Point is the northernmost part of the island. Here is an impressive blowhole.